Coral Castle

Coral Castle
Homestead, Florida

Coral Castle doesn’t look much like a castle, but that hasn’t discouraged generations of tourists from wanting to see it. That’s because it was built by one man, Ed Leedskalnin, a Latvian immigrant who single-handedly and mysteriously excavated, carved, and erected over 2.2 million pounds of coral rock to build this place, even though he stood only five feet tall and weighed a mere 100 pounds.

Ed built his castle to impress Agnes Scuffs, a 16-year-old who had jilted him on the day before their wedding. Various explanations are given for her cold feet: Ed was too poor, too uneducated, too old. Maybe he was just too crazy. After all, Ed was a man who spent 20 years building an open-air compound stocked with lumpy rock tables, chairs, and beds, with no electricity or running water, and expected that Agnes would fall in love with it and with him.
Ed was as secretive as he was misguided. He never told anyone how he carved and set into place the walls, gates, monoliths, and moon crescents that make up much of his Castle. Some of these blocks weigh as much as 30 tons. Ed often worked at night, by lantern light, so that no one could see him. He used only tools that he fashioned himself from wrecks in an auto junkyard.

Ed died in 1951 and the Castle opened as a tourist attraction in 1953. It has survived countless storms without a scratch — a testament to Ed’s handiwork — although the sign that advertises the place was blown to pieces by hurricane Wilma in 2005.

A problem that we sometimes find with attractions built by people like Ed is that the person dies, and no one is left to explain the hows and whys of the place. Coral Castle has enough history to stand on its own without Ed — butit’s also fortunate to have a tour guide by the name of Ray Ramirez, who is here to take up the slack. “I’ve been researching him for years,” Ray tells us. Ray’s favorite word is “incredible,” and he’s not afraid to use it.
“What is in your pamphlet is the romantic presentation,” Ray says as the tour begins, his voice edged with disdain. “Let me show you some things here that are incredible.”

Ray wiggles the 3-Ton Gate at the entrance, marks off a few paces, draws a spot on the earth with his toe, and tells one of us to stand on that exact spot. “Offer resistance against me,” he commands, as he pushes down on our outstretched arm. We hold firm. Ray then hops back to the Gate, shifts it slightly, and comes back to push down again. This time our arm collapses. Ray calls this “a kinesiology effect” and tells us that whenever the flat side of the Gate with the little notch in it points at someone, “you become much stronger” because “energy is compatible with limestone, because limestone’s got a lot of calcium carbonate.” Like your bones.

Ray believes that this kind of knowledge — which he says was given to Ed by a “wizard” in Latvia — helped Ed to move the big blocks of coral. Ray also believes that Ed’s remarkable abilities had something to do with lines, angles, and alignments, which Ray can see everywhere within the Castle compound, and which he points out at every available opportunity.
Electromagnetism plays a role as well. Did Ed magnetize the rocks and float them into place? Ray scowls at our silly question. Of course not. Ed simply made the rocks lighter, and that made them easier to move.

New members join our group from time to time, mostly retired couples, evidently expecting to receive a straightforward, nuts-and-bolts explanation as to how Ed built the place. Most of them don’t last long with Ray, who bobs, weaves, and waves his arms like an aerobic instructor as he stomps around the compound. Ray talks about Ed’s “perpetual motion holder” and insists that the Coral Castle’s sundial proves that “the books on astronomy are wrong.” He points to one of the many coral rocking chairs in the compound. “Ed would sit in this chair like a statue, eyes closed,” Ray says. “Like he was dead. So I wonder if he was into a trance, or if he was a time traveler? One of the two.”

Ed’s greatest achievement at Coral Castle was the 9-Ton Gate, a mighty slab of coral rock set on its side that could pivot in a circle with the push of only one finger. When we visited the Castle in 1985, we were told that the 9-Ton Gate had been working until six months before we arrived, when it had finally fallen off of its bearing and was stuck. Twenty-five years later, Ray tells us the exact same story. But Ray insists that the gate had been fixed in 1986 — and while it took Ed only five days, working alone, to set it in place, Ray says that it took “a 20 ton crane, crane operator, engineer, and a crew of five, two weeks” to repair it. Ray repeats this line every time that a new member joins our group, and so we believe him.
The Gate, however, is not completely disabled. Although it is now sheltered within a steel cage, it can still be pushed with one finger, but only from right to left. Pushing it the other way requires considerable force, which Ray demonstrates with vigor. Why this should be so is a mystery to us, but not to Ray, who insists that the repair crew made “the big mistakes” by not taking electromagnetism into account. “The gate has the shaft. That would pull the magnetic energy! Magnetic energy cannot go through the hub, because it’s a solid object! My question is, how many degrees of magnetic vortex is required?”
Ray pauses for dramatic effect. We stand frozen, not in awe but in trying to figure out what it is that Ray has just told us. “Incredible,” Ray says again, for emphasis. And that, apparently, is that.

We hang with Ray for another hour — and then we finally have to leave. “Everything that I’ve told you, most of it is not written anywhere,” Ray says as we head for the car. “If you have any questions, just ask me. ‘Cause I’m the guy who knows all the answers.”

Coral Castle

Address:

28655 S. Dixie Hwy, Homestead, FL
Directions:
Florida Turnpike to Homestead, exit 5 (SW 288th St.). West for 1.5 miles to SW 157th Ave., then turn right. One block north, on the corner of U.S. 1 and SW 157th Ave.
Hours:
Su-Th 8-6, F-Sa 8-8 (Call to verify)
Phone:
305-248-6345
Admission:
Adults $15.00

Text taken from:
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/2056

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And then, there is this:
http://pesn.com/2012/09/27/9602196_Coral_Castle_Busted_–_Interesting_but_not_Magic/

Coral Castle Busted — Interesting but not Anti-Gravity

How could one man, 5 feet tall and barely 100 pounds, excavate, shape, and hoist hundreds of massive coral blocks, the largest weighing 28 tons, into a structure by himself? This mystery has intrigued people for decades, drawing visitors from all over the world. But the truth is much less intriguing, though still impressive.

by Sterling D. Allan
Pure Energy Systems News

On the way home from my “Scouting for Free Energy Technologies in Europe” trip, I stopped in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, to check out a couple of technologies. 

One is a thermal electric technology and was the primary reason for my stop in Florida. But unfortunately, the inventor, Carlos Avila Rivera, was busy with investors and couldn’t break away. He promised to come to Salt Lake later to demonstrate it to me there.

So as a good second option, I hoped to stop by Blue World Crete, which turns municipal solid waste into building materials, while also eliminating their toxicity. But a conflict of interest was discovered at the last minute, and we had to cancel that visit.

While in town, my hosts, Fred and Zuri Hart, took me to Coral Castle in Miami.
The mystique has been strong around this structure built by Ed Leedskalnin, who was love struck by a gal who didn’t reciprocate his affection, so he built a monument to her, using huge pieces of Coral, the largest weighing 28 tons.
And he supposedly built it by himself — at night, so no one could discover how he did it — a feat that is phenomenal for anyone. That he was only 5 feet tall and weighed a mere 100 pounds, increases the mystique. Allegedly, no one knows how he accomplished this; and this mystery is increased by his statement to the effect, “I think I have figured out how they built the pyramids.” There is even a legend about some witnesses to his having levitated the stones.

Also on the premises is an odd looking device that some speculate could have been an all-magnet motor, possibly involved in the levitation work.

A plethora of Masonic symbolism, and Ed’s involvement with the Masons, expands the imagination further into the possibility that some kind of forgotten occult practices were used as well.

An inscription on the second floor door is thought to have been some kind of hint he left for people to be able to figure out how he accomplished the seemingly impossible.

It turns out that every one of these mysteries has a very boring answer, and the reason Ed milked the mystique was that it brought business in the form of curious visitors, who each plunked down ten cents (worth a lot more back then) for the privilege. He was probably even more motivated by the awe that people exhibited as they marveled at how any man could do what he did.

How do I know this?

First, near the end of our tour, our guide, James T. Miller, mentioned a few things that got us curious, so we got to asking around, and in doing a follow-up interview with James to post to YouTube, as well as some additional probing, we got a lot of great information. James said he has post-graduate degrees and has been a lawyer for 33 years and a historian and college professor. He does all of his own research. “What I say at the Coral Castle is not a script. I have complete freedom to say whatever I want.”
http://pesn.com/2012/09/27/9602196_Coral_Castle_Busted_–_Interesting_but_not_Magic/
You are here: PureEnergySystems.com > News > September 27, 2012
Coral Castle Busted — Interesting but not Anti-Gravity

How could one man, 5 feet tall and barely 100 pounds, excavate, shape, and hoist hundreds of massive coral blocks, the largest weighing 28 tons, into a structure by himself? This mystery has intrigued people for decades, drawing visitors from all over the world. But the truth is much less intriguing, though still impressive.

by Sterling D. Allan
Pure Energy Systems News

On the way home from my “Scouting for Free Energy Technologies in Europe” trip, I stopped in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, to check out a couple of technologies. 

One is a thermal electric technology and was the primary reason for my stop in Florida. But unfortunately, the inventor, Carlos Avila Rivera, was busy with investors and couldn’t break away. He promised to come to Salt Lake later to demonstrate it to me there.

So as a good second option, I hoped to stop by Blue World Crete, which turns municipal solid waste into building materials, while also eliminating their toxicity. But a conflict of interest was discovered at the last minute, and we had to cancel that visit.

While in town, my hosts, Fred and Zuri Hart, took me to Coral Castle in Miami.

The mystique has been strong around this structure built by Ed Leedskalnin, who was love struck by a gal who didn’t reciprocate his affection, so he built a monument to her, using huge pieces of Coral, the largest weighing 28 tons.
And he supposedly built it by himself — at night, so no one could discover how he did it — a feat that is phenomenal for anyone. That he was only 5 feet tall and weighed a mere 100 pounds, increases the mystique. Allegedly, no one knows how he accomplished this; and this mystery is increased by his statement to the effect, “I think I have figured out how they built the pyramids.” There is even a legend about some witnesses to his having levitated the stones.

Also on the premises is an odd looking device that some speculate could have been an all-magnet motor, possibly involved in the levitation work.

A plethora of Masonic symbolism, and Ed’s involvement with the Masons, expands the imagination further into the possibility that some kind of forgotten occult practices were used as well.

An inscription on the second floor door is thought to have been some kind of hint he left for people to be able to figure out how he accomplished the seemingly impossible.

It turns out that every one of these mysteries has a very boring answer, and the reason Ed milked the mystique was that it brought business in the form of curious visitors, who each plunked down ten cents (worth a lot more back then) for the privilege. He was probably even more motivated by the awe that people exhibited as they marveled at how any man could do what he did.

How do I know this?

First, near the end of our tour, our guide, James T. Miller, mentioned a few things that got us curious, so we got to asking around, and in doing a follow-up interview with James to post to YouTube, as well as some additional probing, we got a lot of great information. James said he has post-graduate degrees and has been a lawyer for 33 years and a historian and college professor. He does all of his own research. “What I say at the Coral Castle is not a script. I have complete freedom to say whatever I want.”

One guide kept prefacing what he said with, “I’m not supposed to be saying this,” and “don’t tell anyone I told you this.”

The Coral Castle museum would loose its draw if people knew what we were being told. Not good for business, especially if the business is based on myth.

What magician tells his audience how he does his tricks?

The problem is that people don’t consider Coral Castle as a magic show. They often consider it a display from someone who figured out how to get around the forces of gravity.

If Ed truly had mastered levitation, then why did it take him 20 years to build the structure?

What is the truth about Coral Castle?

First, let me tell you a little about our tour guide and his qualifications.

Note the wedge marks along the edges of the stone.
He has lived in the area all his life, and became intrigued by the castle as a child. He has also worked with the extraction of large stone, so he has physical experience with the processes. He’s also talked to several local people who were witnesses to the building of the structure, and he has done research about the structure and its legends.

In the tour, he showed us photos of Ed hoisting the stones via a block and tackle apparatus, with heavy chains and three posts in a tripod. “Give me a lever long enough and I could move the world,” is a famous quote by Archimedes. Do a Google image search on Ed Leedskalnin and block and tackle. This method was pioneered in Latvia where Ed emigrated from.

James has talked to people who remember seeing Ed using the block and tackle. And they remember him building during the day some times.

As for horizontal movement, James referred to a website: http://www.theforgottentechnology.com/ It features a carpenter by the name of W.T. Wallington from Flint, Michigan, who has demonstrated the ability to move very heavy objects horizontally by himself using simple methods. 

With modern equipment, it’s hard for us to fathom such feats, but before that equipment was available, clever people came up with ways to use leverage and pivots to move large objects.

The primary reason Ed built at night at first was that it is very hot during the day. I’m guessing that later on, as the mystique grew, he fostered that mystique the best he could.

As for the legend that people saw Ed levitating stones, a local policeman shed light on that one. He said that Ed had problems with kids breaking in at night, to spy on him. When the policeman showed up to question some kids one night, they didn’t want to get in trouble, so with theatrical faces, they said something to the effect that they had seen Ed levitating the stones. The officer, who knew how Ed moved the stones, rolled his eyes, and shoed them away.

As for the writing on the door posts on the second floor, that was actually a common practice for immigrants in the area at the time. In order to secure their immigration number, they would write it on the door post. The numbers on Ed’s stone post are consistent with that.

The magnet motor contraption was nothing more than a very crude electric generator with copper coils (now absent) that powered two small lights, nothing more. It only worked as long as the generator was turning, which probably didn’t happen very often because of its weight.

James pointed out the markings on the rock where Ed had used metal slats to pound into the rock to split it from the base. You chip away the vertical sides, then excavate a place large enough next to the stone to pound the iron slats in. James pointed to the iron slats on display and noted their pointed edge on one side and hammered edge on the opposite side. James himself has used that method. It is standard practice when you don’t have explosives. 

And the shaping of the rocks was done by a chain with a cutting edge on it. This is also standard practice.

As for the large pivoting door that you could turn with just one finger (both Jim and Fred remember doing that years ago, before the bearings gave out), which made people marvel at how Ed might have balanced that so well, James knows someone who did a 1-ton replica to illustrate the process. You find the center of gravity and drive in a post, remove stone from either side until it is balanced, and then you place the side posts so that they fit.

Learning all this, the biggest question is why someone would do this, other than to make a point that it could be done. He certainly was not introducing advanced technology that some day someone would unfold to bring gravity modification to the masses.

So, when Ed said he thought he’d figured out how the pyramids were made, he was apparently referring to tripods, block and tackle, fulcrum leverage, etc — all largely forgotten technology to us today.

I must mention that, to their credit, one of the fliers that the museum gave us upon entrance does talk about block and tackle, but they make it sound like the fame of the facility is despite that. I would argue that the fame is largely due to people thinking something more exotic than that was used. I can tell you that I would not have bothered to show up if I knew beforehand that block and tackle were used.

*************
What now, my fair readers?
What do you really think?

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About Kenneth T.

My blog, My way Welcome to a little piece of my life. Here you will find things concerning my everyday experiences and or my thoughts on everyday happenings. For instance you may find thoughts of my Farmstead, which is as my wife calls it, our Accidental Farming life. Perhaps on a whim, I might just jump on a soap box about what's going on with my crazy family (the immediate one, that is).~You don't need to put a penny in the coin slot for any commentary there~ You may find, new additions to what I call "Hobby-time". Ahh yes, my hobby... I make pinback buttons (some call them badges). Sorry for the shameful plug ;-) *** And then there is the outside the box or "Offtrack" thinking, part of me. Which can be anything else from aliens to the zoology of the Loch Ness monster, but will probably be more mundane as health concerns, for instance, to vaccinate or not. Is the Earth Flat or is it Hollow? Is there a dome? Is any of it real? Do you really want to know? Police brutality and the continuing corruption of established government, Big Business, Big Oil, Big Brother. Can we survive? Should we survive? The coming montrary collapse. There is so much going on, more then we see outside our windows.
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2 Responses to Coral Castle

  1. I love Coral Castle. I haven’t been there in years, but I remember Leonard Nemoy’s show “In Search of” did a special on it a hundred years ago and I just had to go see it. For me the amazing part was where he got the coral from. There are these trenches where neatly carved out enormous blocks were just lifted from the ground. It wasn’t lifted and then carved into the shape, it came out of the ground in giant rectangles. Amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kenneth T. says:

      I love Coral Castle as well, even though I have never been to see it (yet). Perhaps it was “In search of” that first drew my attention, as well. (was it really a hundred years ago? – – LoL)
      For me, the mystery of how it was done is only a small part of why I want to see it. The very nature of the place, not just the back story, makes for a mysterious AND interesting spot to visit.
      Someday, I will make it there. SOMEDAY.

      Liked by 1 person

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